Zeal Weight Management Program Archives

Zeal for Life Weight Management Program is a fantastic tool to help women achieve a safe and healthy weight loss. Zeal for Life Weight Management Program has proven itself especially helpful for women having a difficult time losing those extra pounds. The Zeal for Life Weight Management Program is very effective on its own however, being committed to achieving your weight loss goals through exercise and discipline is key to success and necessary to maintain your ideal weight. As you will see below, Ellen Olstein wrote an article in the Huffington Post that demonstrates how commitment and change helped her lose more than 80 pounds.

Name: Ellen Olstein

Age: 33

Height: 5'6"

Before Weight: 247 pounds

Zeal for Life Weight Management ProgramHow I Gained It: I was never a "skinny" person. As a child, I always carried a bit of extra weight on my frame compared to the other children in my neighborhood and at the small, Catholic school that I attended. I was always very conscious of the fact that I was "heavier" than the other girls, and this realization bothered me a great deal until I went to college.

During my college years, I lost a bit of weight, but not through healthy means. I ate sporadically, never got enough sleep and generally kept very odd hours. I also worked, attended classes as a full-time student and was a tireless social butterfly. Thanks to this busy lifestyle, combined with still having the metabolism of a young adult, I was able to maintain a fairly healthy weight of approximately 150 pounds throughout my college career. It wasn't until I graduated with my bachelor's degree in May 2000 and began working at my first full-time desk job that I began to pack on the pounds.

After college, I continued to eat like a college student. I never cooked or prepared homemade meals. I ate out for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and I watched my waistline quickly expand past the "regular" women's clothing section and into the plus-sizes. As I continued to gain weight, I repeatedly asked myself how I could've let myself go in such a way. I would regularly beat myself up about the excessive amount of weight that I gained, but would never take the necessary steps to improve my situation and try to lose it. I continued to eat my favorite foods, which included gyros, French fries and pizza. I joined a gym located only one block away from my apartment, but I rarely went. When I would go, I would quickly become frustrated and would end my workout prematurely.

Breaking Point: My husband and I moved to Philadelphia in 2005 when I luckily found a new job in the Center City area. We had been trying to move from Pittsburgh to Philadelphia for a two-year period of time, and I decided to use the opportunity as a new beginning not only career-wise, but also health-wise.

How I Lost It: Before making the move to Philly, I immediately got rid of my car. I decided that I would take public transit everywhere that I needed to go in the city. This led to the habit of walking. At first, walking for even 30 minutes was incredibly difficult. My feet would swell, and I hated the feeling of "huffing and puffing" everywhere I had to go. However, after only a few months of walking, I found myself enjoying the act of walking anywhere that was within walking distance. After one year of this newfound habit, I bought a bike and used it as my main form of transportation for one full year. I lost 20 pounds during that year of cycling my way to-and-from work, the grocery store and anywhere else that I needed to or felt like going.

The following year, inspired by my husband, I joined a neighborhood gym and immediately fell in love with it. I discovered that the gym was a place where I could constantly challenge myself, and I continue to view it in this positive way. These days, I am constantly looking for new ways to raise the bar. I have become addicted to Spinning, and take three classes per week. I have also started taking a boot camp class once a week. On Sundays, I take my morning three-mile run into the city. Every single day, I try to do something that gets me up and moving. I still have a desk job, but I am constantly dreaming about exercise. I look forward to my regular gym trips.

Additionally, I have done a great deal of online research about diet and nutrition. I am a pescatarian, and I believe that eating a healthy, balanced diet is best. My favorite foods now include fruit, vegetables, salmon, whole grain breads, Greek yogurt and dark chocolate (in moderation, of course). I have learned that you can still love food while getting and staying healthy. I absolutely love to cook these days, and I look forward to coming home and making a wholesome meal after work. Some regular dinner staples in our house are tofu-and- veggie stir-fry dishes and vegetarian tacos and various other Mexican dishes. For breakfast, I make myself a homemade smoothie or an English muffin with sliced hard-boiled egg or peanut butter. I make sure that lunch is my biggest meal of the day and dinner is my smallest. I also count my calories using the Lose It! app for my IPhone.

Losing weight is one of the most difficult endeavors that I have ever taken on in my life. As a woman, I feel that I am constantly being judged by my weight and my looks. However, it is important to remember that I am the same loving, caring, friendly person that I was when I was 247 pounds. The difference is that I have grown mentally and emotionally throughout this journey. I love the mind/body connection that is associated with weight loss and physical exertion. For years, as far back as my childhood, I was made to feel that I was never "good enough" or worthy of respect and happiness. Pushing myself and dedicating every ounce of my being to my weight loss journey has proven those assumptions and negative thoughts wrong. My goal is to lose 15 more pounds, and I hope to one day become a certified Spin instructor. I want to inspire others to put their health first, and to communicate the message that they are also worthy of self-respect and happiness.

Original article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/11/weight-loss-success-ellen-olstein_n_1496248.html?ref=health-and-fitness&ir=Health%20and%20Fitness

Weight loss success can be made easy combining regular moderate exercise with the Zeal for Life Weight Management Program. By committing yourself mentally to achieving your goals and taking the necessary steps to reduce unneeded calories as well as incorporating exercise and the Zeal for Life Weight Management Program your goals are attainable. Zeal for life weight management program helps you to reduce calories by replacing meals with healthy protein rich shakes and nutrient dense drinks to help keep your body burning calories while reducing overall caloric intake. Find out more about the Zeal for Life Weight Management Program here. See real-life, Zeal for Life Weight Management Program success stories and product testimonials here. Comment below on your weight loss success story and share this post with others.

Zeal Weight Management Program combined with moderate exercise helps dieters break that plateau when weight loss is diminished. Zeal Weight Management Program with exercise can aid dieters and help them take weight loss to the next level. George Black outlines a routine to help people stay on track and keep weight loss slow and steady. This routine along with the Zeal Weight Management Program gives dieters an increased opportunity for achieving their weight loss goals. 

How To Break Through A Weight Loss Plateau…

Zeal Weight Management ProgramA few days ago, a customer asked me this question: 

"I eat healthfully, and exercise at least an hour every day, but I've been stuck at 146-150 for a while now. How can I get over this plateau and keep losing?"

The older I get, I like to tell myself that I'm becoming smarter – or I may be just becoming lazier. In any case, I definitely don't work out that much. You can get great results without training that much. I was able to tolerate 1-hour workouts every day when I was 20 – but not anymore. I don't know you but there is a possibility that you are overtraining. The fact that you train for one hour a day tells me that you have a lot of zeal. Here are the questions you need to ask yourself so you get over the plateau:

1) What type of exercise do you do each day? Is it only aerobic or do you do resistance training as well? If you are not doing resistance training, replace some of your exercise time (at least half) with resistance training. I'm convinced that "normal people" can achieve almost any weight management goal they have by training properly with weights for 40 minutes every other day. Get in there, do your exercises and then get out. You don't need to train more. You need to train smart. Get your weight training down. THEN you can add the aerobics if you want.

2) If you ARE doing resistance training, are you getting stronger every workout? Yes or no? Can you lift more weight or do more reps with the same weight? Yes or no? If no, then you may be overtrained or maybe you are not eating enough protein or sleeping and resting properly.

3) Did you measure your weight AND fat percentage before starting exercising? Where are you now? Did you lose weight? Was that fat? Or did you lose muscle? You can't improve what you can't measure. If you are losing muscle, you will just continue spinning your wheels.

4) Exercising can get boring. And the body adjusts to the "same ol', same ol'" after a while. Try changing up your workout routine so you don't get bored.

Remember to keep track of your progress. Measure your weight, fat and muscle once a week on an empty stomach in the morning. Know how you are progressing and "fail fast" if need be. If you see a week that you gained fat and lost muscle (it happens even in the best families) try to readjust your plan. Don't make the mistake that many people make and that's following a plan that doesn't work FOR YEARS. This is called "failing in slow motion". You want fast results? Measure your progress then.

If you keep an ultra strict diet for several days, then you can reward yourself by having a "free day" where you eat some of your favorites foods like pizza, cheesecake etc. Don't eat 10,000 calories, ok? But taking a break every now and then can really help you stay on track for the long term.

You have much more control over your life that others would have you believe. Right now, you are overweight because of some very specific habits you have. Focus on those habits. As soon as you correct them, you will be able to start losing weight and fat and looking great.

Forget who you have been all your life. Saying things like "I'm a fat boy" or "I look like a barrel" don't help you. Stay away from the victim mentality. Decide who you are going to be from this point on.

Before you go to bed each night, spend just 5 minutes to plan the next day. What are you going to do at 8:00 AM? What at 10:25 AM? Note down your program. What will you eat? When will you exercise? This will allow you to "fly" through the next day much easier. Don't just wait for the next day to come and then just "react" to whatever comes your way. Remember: Failing to plan is planning to fail.

Many people say "I can't do weight training (or exercise at all) because I'm in no physical condition to do so".

This is one of the best examples of the "problem" being the ultimate solution. START working out now. Take it slowly. Start gently. Soon you'll be in such unbelievable shape you'll wonder how you ever lived without eating right and exercising. Nothing feels like being in great shape does.

Starting a weight loss program can be challenging or even scary for some people. We all have fear in at least one sector of our lives. But you need to realize that the next step in your personal growth (and weight loss), is feeling "uncomfortable". Only when you step out of your comfort zone will you start to improve. Take it one step at a time and give it your best shot. Be bold…

By: George Black –


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